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Wednesday, 16 September 2015 10:03

Mi Casa Shop

Mi Casa Shop offers quality, low-price home textiles such as blankets, comforters, curtains, rugs, quilts, sheets and much more to customers across the world. After successfully selling hundreds of thousands of items in San Diego, Los Angeles and Mexico for over 15 years to the wholesale market, the company is finally reaching out to the retail online market to offer its products worldwide.

Published in Web
Thursday, 17 September 2015 09:58

Vento

Vento offers a range of urban and off-road motorcycles throughout Mexico and Latin America. They reached out to Bloominari in order to get a brand new website that was super user friendly, modern, responsive and attractive. After several months of hard work, unique web and graphic design our team designed a great new site and the client was super happy with it.

Published in Web
Tuesday, 14 July 2015 19:48

Outsourzia

Outsourzia.com is an American contract manufacturing company based in San Diego, California offering quality production, efficient contract assembly, and consistent compliance with manufacturing standards. They helps US-based businesses by providing nearshore outsource manufacturing in Tijuana, Mexico.

Published in Web
Monday, 15 June 2015 18:07

My Selfie Kiosk

My Selfie Kiosk is NEW MEXICO’S MOST FUN WAY TO PARTY. It's a brand new redesign of the old-school photo booth.

Published in Web

What is an Explainer Video?

A great way to share your ideas in an easy-to-understand format.

An explainer video is a special type of marketing video focused on explaining to your target audience what your company, brand, products or services are all about in a few short minutes.

Explainer videos are generally between 30 seconds to 2-3 minutes long, sometimes longer depending on the content.

An Explainer Video is a very effective marketing tool to get your message out there in a fast, friendly and fun way.

Today we live in a content-intensive information world where people are bombarded with too many ads, posts, messages, which has resulted in them having a short attention span to any one message.

For this reason, a short, sweet and well-created explainer video can have a great impact on marketing an idea, brand, and benefits of a product or service.

What is the purpose of an Explainer Video?

The goal of an explainer video is simple: To highlight the key benefits of a product or service that a company offers.

People mostly care about how something can help them solve or alleviate a pain point, and a short video is a perfect way to convey this message in a short and direct way, cutting out all the clutter that a brochure or complex website would offer through written text. 

What should an Explainer Video include?

The video should be short and to the point, that’s the goal of this digital marketing tool.

The video should include and highlight various key points to increase the likeliness that people will trust you, your message and will invite them to take action.

Your video should include the following key points:

  1. A short introduction to your company and brand
  2. Company’s tagline or key value proposition. What pain or problem do you help solve for your potential clients?
  3. A highlight of three to seven key benefits of your product/service, and how you help solve customer pain points.
  4. How are your offerings different than the rest of the competition? Why should clients choose to work with your business?
  5. Remind your audience once again what makes you an expert.
  6. Use a call-to-action towards the end and push your viewer to engage with you further.
  7. Finish the video with your company’s logo and contact information.

Published in Marketing & Strategy

Beginner designers too often feel the need to overdo their designs attempting to make them look artistic or elaborate.

We have all heard the expression “less is more”. Usually, this is said to mean ‘cheaper is better’. In truth, however, “less is more” isn’t about spending less money.

It is about achieving better design through simplicity. It is about finding the greatest impact through subtraction and restraint.

Newborn creatives try and mask their infancy with flashy graphics and elaborate typefaces. I too, was guilty of this when first starting out.

All this really does, unfortunately, is overcrowd and overcomplicate the piece. Just because a design is simple doesn’t mean its basic or uncomplex. '

Having too many elements in design gives the viewer too much to digest and takes away from the other elements in the piece and the design as a whole. 

Published in Design

Recently we unveiled for you part 1 of our feature 20 Unignorable Rules of Graphic Design adopted from Timothy Samara’s Visual Elements: A Graphic Style Manual. If you missed it you can find it here.

In this second half of the article, I will break down for you ten more unignorable rules that constitute graphic design.

As always remember that these rules aren’t set to never be broken no matter what. Rather, when you do choose to break them do so with a specific intent in mind to better convey your message.

On that note, happy designing and let’s get started! 

11. Be Universal; It’s Not Just About You

Artists often create for themselves, but as a designer, you create for everyone else. Your audience must know what it is you are trying to say with those shapes and lines and colors, not just a few ‘enlightened’ folks. Your designs are ultimately being used to promote a concert or relay instructions in a manual or something else communicative. While you should most definitely leave your own creative mark on every piece of work, you will be ultimately judged by how effectively you convey the message, not how pretty your piece looks.

12. Squish and Separate

If it’s your intention to make your piece look dull and lifeless, then, by all means, align everything with equal proportions using the same color, shape, and typeface. On the chance, you want to give it some actual life (which hint, hint you should always be doing), move things around and squish some elements together. Give the viewer’s eyes some curves to follow by creating a flowing piece ramp with contrast and density.

Published in Design
Tuesday, 12 August 2014 17:00

Kona's K9 Club

Kona's K9 Club offers dog walking and dog outdoor experiences for Northern San Diego residents. They reached out to Bloominari searching for a one-stop service for designing a new logo and website that would allow them to attract new customers, allow people to book online appointments, and to share images of their events with their community.

Bloominari took on the challenge and created a new logo, designed a new  sharp-looking website, integrated their Instagram account into their photo gallery and built an online reservations systems where customers could choose when to have their dog taken out for a stroll. Checkout their website using the link below  

Published in Web

A person’s impression of what’s ‘good’ or ‘bad’ design generally is picked up through education and experience. Accumulated from the multitude of designers and critics who came before them, most criteria inevitably boil down to personal preference.

Some are aesthetically based, like “asymmetry is more beautiful than symmetry,” or “a neutral typeface is all you need.” Other factors are more functional, such as “never reversing a serif typeface on a solid background if it’s less than 10 points.”

All rules are meant to be broken, but they should never be completely ignored. This set is not intended to be a definitive checklist to making good design. It should, however, provide points to be considered in every creative project you take on.

Adapted from Timothy Samara’s Design Elements: A Graphic Style Manual, here are

20 unignorable rules of graphic design

1. Have A Concept

Every, every, every design you ever make must have a meaning behind it. Plain and Simple. It doesn’t matter how beautiful your art is or how creative your graphics look. If your design doesn’t contain a story, an idea or a message you are trying to convey, it isn’t graphic design. It’s just pretty pictures on a page. Tell us something with your work.

2. Communicate, Don’t Decorate

Form carries meaning. No matter how simple or abstract that form may be, a form that doesn’t match up communicates conflicting messages to your audience. Experiment with different shapes, details, colors and effects, and explore how they all can work together to support your message. Without keeping your message in mind, your work runs the risk of simply becoming a collage of graphics no longer qualifying as communicative design. Everything the viewer sees should be there for a reason.

Published in Design
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